Brian Lamb: “I think Creative Commons is a cultural agreement”

Brian Lamb at the festival ZEMOS98 (Sevilla, Spain)

Brian Lamb at the festival ZEMOS98. Photo by Julio Albarrán (CC BY-NC-SA) (Sevilla, Spain)

In the small community of Kamloops, in the interior of British Columbia, Brian Lamb is the Director of Innovation at Thompson Rivers University Open Learning and gives interesting opinions about Creative Commons and intellectual property.

This interview was previously featured in the post Canadians using CC licenses. Lamb is one of the members of the Creative Commons Canada Advisory Board and founded some the earliest campus services for blogs and wikis in Canada. His weblog,, is highly recommendable.

 – How did you start using Creative Commons?

I worked in education technology medium for a long time and, early on, I got really frustrated with traditional education technology that tends to be so controlled – “This is your classroom, this is activity 1, this is activity 2” – because on my spare time I was using a weblog, wikis… and I thought “This is way easier, way cheaper, more fun” Continue reading

Open Movie Project: “Tears of Steel”

Official poster for Blender Foundation's "Tears of Steel" (CC-BY)

Official poster for Blender Foundation’s “Tears of Steel” (CC-BY)

The visual effects of “Tears of Steel” have nothing to envy big sci-fi film productions from major cinema companies that collapse theatres worldwide. However, this shortfilm was not produced in Hollywood but in the Netherlands, was developed through open software and has not follow an usual circuti of distribution for this kind of productions, instead, can be found entirely online and purchased on a DVD with extra content.

This 12-minutes shortfilm, online released on September 2012, is the fourth open movie production by Dutch studio for open 3D projects Blender Institute. An independent production financed by its online community through crowdfunding and the support of the Netherlands Film Fund, Ginegrid consortium corporate sponsors such as Google.

The project was an incentive to develop a free and open source pipeline for visual effects in film industry, which uses the creation software Blender 3D, developed by this institute. Following the philosophy of a true open movie, the final production and all the material developed on the filmmaking process is released under Creative Commons licences, so other filmmakers can study and reproduce the details of the creation process. Continue reading

Ian MacKenzie: “I think CC arose as a response to the desire of remix”

Filmmaker & Crowdfunding writer,  Ian MacKenzie, Twitter profile picture (@ianmack)

Ian MacKenzie, filmmaker and crowdfunding writer (@ianmack)

Another interview from Canadians using CC licenses: Ian MacKenzie was one of the panelists at the Creative Commons Canada Salon in Vancouver, October 15. He is not only a filmmaker, now known specially for the documentary about Occupy Wall Street movement, “Occupy Love”, but also an advocate for crowdfunding as a new, innovative and alternative way to fund his productions. We talked by Skype about this and more:

– When did you first hear about Creative Commons?

I started knowing about Creative Commons because I was using Flickr and I saw they featured options for Creative Commons. From there I started looking through it and researching on it and the philosophy behind Creative Commons.  Continue reading


Bassel Safadi, photo by Joi Ito (CC BY).

Bassel Safadi was at the CC Asia Conference 2010 in Seoul (South Korea). Photo by Joi Ito (CC BY).

After more than a year, no one has received yet any official explanation or reasons to the detention of Bassel Khartabil, a Palestinian-Syrian well-respected computer engineer, 31 year old, specialized in open source software development who volunteered on Internet projects like Creative Commons, Mozilla Firefox, Wikipedia or Open Clip Art Library.

Khartabil, who is better known online and in technology communities as Bassel Safadi was detained on March 15, 2012, in a wave of arrests in the Mazzeh, district of Damascus (Syria), no trial.

Friends and family started on July 2012 the campaing #FREEBASSEL to to raise global awareness about Bassel’s situation and fight to see him free.  Continue reading

Mary Burgess: “There is still some concern about intellectual property for faculty and how all would work”

Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess (BCcampus)

Second full interview from Canadians using CC licensesThe re-launched Creative Commons Canada has BCcampus as the main institution representing Creative Commons in the British Columbia area. In a conversation by Skype with Mary Burgess, the Director of Curriculum Services and Applied Research, introduces to the organization and its involvement on the Creative Commons mission and her particular involvement in open education.

 – What is BCcampus and when did you started working in this organization?

BCcampus is a group that is funded by the BC’s Ministry of Advanced Education, to provide collaborative services and resourcing, an advocacy for education technology, online learning and open education initiatives. This is where the Creative Commons comes in, for us.  Continue reading

#MP3Tribute: 100 CC-licensed albums

Words and projects remembering Aaron Swartz‘s legacy are all over the Internet. In his memory, the DJ, hacker and electronic musician Jairus Khan started the #MP3Tribute, where he wants to collect over a 100 CC-licensed music albums to release on Swartz’s memory, for his involvement in the first steps of Creative Commons licences.

List of songs currently available at the #MP3Tribute for you to listen &/or download

List of songs currently available at the #MP3Tribute for you to listen and/or download under BY-NC-ND licence.

The idea is simple: Khan is asking artists to contribute with their work, which should be “commercially available at some point” but NOT already released under Creative Commons or any other similar open licence.

By contributing, artists would make those albums, that previously were illegal to copy, available to audiences worldwide under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivates (BY-NC-ND) licence.

So far, Khan collected over 15 different styles albums: from the dark music from Crack Nation to the hip-hop of Jesse Dangerously or the folk by H.U.M.A.N.W.I.N.E., and many other sounds in between.

Continue reading

Kent Mewhort: “CC was looking for an institutional presence in Canada”

Kent Mewhort at CC Global Summit 2011. Photo by David Kindler (CC BY)

Kent Mewhort at CC Global Summit 2011. Photo by David Kindler (CC BY)

Many interesting points of views about Creative Commons and intellectual property did not appear in Canadians using CC licenses so, in the next weeks, the full interviews will be posted in individual posts under a new category.

 Full interviews start with a conversation on Skype with Kent Mewhort, an independent Ontario lawyer and legal project lead for Creative Commons Canada, former staff lawyer at Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), a non-profit legal clinic at the University of Ottawa. The interview starts discovering his professional background and initial involvement with CC licences and continuos explores the early history of Creative Commons.

How did you get involved with Creative Commons? 

I come from software engineering background; I’ve being always interested in software licensing and is from it that I first got interested in Creative Commons. Continue reading