Tagged: Creative Commons Salon

Mary Burgess: “There is still some concern about intellectual property for faculty and how all would work”

Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess (BCcampus)

Second full interview from Canadians using CC licensesThe re-launched Creative Commons Canada has BCcampus as the main institution representing Creative Commons in the British Columbia area. In a conversation by Skype with Mary Burgess, the Director of Curriculum Services and Applied Research, introduces to the organization and its involvement on the Creative Commons mission and her particular involvement in open education.

 – What is BCcampus and when did you started working in this organization?

BCcampus is a group that is funded by the BC’s Ministry of Advanced Education, to provide collaborative services and resourcing, an advocacy for education technology, online learning and open education initiatives. This is where the Creative Commons comes in, for us.  Continue reading

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Kent Mewhort: “CC was looking for an institutional presence in Canada”

Kent Mewhort at CC Global Summit 2011. Photo by David Kindler (CC BY)

Kent Mewhort at CC Global Summit 2011. Photo by David Kindler (CC BY)

Many interesting points of views about Creative Commons and intellectual property did not appear in Canadians using CC licenses so, in the next weeks, the full interviews will be posted in individual posts under a new category.

 Full interviews start with a conversation on Skype with Kent Mewhort, an independent Ontario lawyer and legal project lead for Creative Commons Canada, former staff lawyer at Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), a non-profit legal clinic at the University of Ottawa. The interview starts discovering his professional background and initial involvement with CC licences and continuos explores the early history of Creative Commons.

How did you get involved with Creative Commons? 

I come from software engineering background; I’ve being always interested in software licensing and is from it that I first got interested in Creative Commons. Continue reading

Canadians using CC licences

Creative Commons Canada profile picture on Twitter. Follow them at @CC_Canada

Creative Commons Canada profile picture on Twitter (@CC_Canada)

For a wide country like Canada, a larger team of Creative Commons supporters is needed in order to build a strong affiliate team that promotes Creative Commons licences and activities as well as free culture and open resources across the country. 

This is a brief overview of different profiles working with or for Creative Commons in the Canadian territory: how they started using CC licences, how this are promoted across the country, their thoughts about plagiarism, copyright VS. copyleft, free culture…

In March 2012, Creative Commons Canada was re-launched in a more institutional way, to give an infrastructure to the team and its activities. Previously, supporters at Creative Commons Canada were just individual volunteers. Continue reading